Is Hyatt's New Elite Promo a Sign They Went Too Far? - Running with Miles
Elite Status Hotels

Is Hyatt’s New Elite Promo a Sign They Went Too Far?

Park Hyatt Mallorca Review
Written by Charlie

The new Hyatt Globalist may be a harder sell for many customers than Hyatt originally thought. Is this new promo a sign they think that too?

Advertiser Disclosure

I will start right out by saying – I love Hyatt! I mean, the staff members I have encountered, their HQ members, the hotels, pretty much everything! But, I also know I wasn’t the only Hyatt Diamond member disappointed when the World of Hyatt rolled out and caused the requirement to reach top tier jump – way up. Is this newest promo a sign that they may realized that as well?

Is Hyatt’s New Elite Promo a Sign They Went Too Far?

Going From Diamond to Globalist

Hyatt was obviously targeting customers that spend either a fair amount of time or a fair amount of nights at their hotel with the new Hyatt Globalist status. I mean, it used to be 25 stays or 50 nights to hit top tier and that jumped to 60 nights to hit the new Globalist level. That means that, on average, the new Globalist that qualifies is staying at a Hyatt property at least one night every 6 nights – or 16% of the year.

The New Globalist Requirements

For business people, that is not hard to do at all. It also aligns itself with other programs like IHG, Club Carlson and Marriott that also require about that many or more nights to hit top status. And, the new World of Hyatt has certainly given some nice new benefits to those Globalists that qualify as well like a free Category 1 – 7 night (a value of around $500 or more, depending where you use it), unlimited suite upgrades at checkin, and free parking on award stays (as well as waived resort fees). All great and a nice way to reward the new Globalist members.

Large Requirement with Small Footprint

But, I had wondered at the time if such a move (to 60 nights) was going to work out for Hyatt. It really requires a big Hyatt loyalist to meet that since Hyatt has a smaller footprint than the other big hotel chains. You could easily spend 100 nights in hotels a year but do it all traveling and not be near Hyatt hotels. I mean, there is a single Hyatt property in the whole country of Greece which has a lot of hotels by other chains! When you get to the US, there are also many cities I have visited that were void of a Hyatt – and I gladly would have stayed at Hyatts.

I figured it may have been a bit ambitious for a brand with their size of footprint (that is growing, though) to require 60 nights for Globalist. After all, you could stay in countries like (mainland) Spain, Israel, and Greece (all tourist hotspots) and find one Hyatt total. Or, you could stay in a small town in the US a bunch on business trips and hit Globalist. Which traveler is the real globalist?

That is the real trouble – a high night requirement (no more stays) for their top tier while not offering hotels in many places around the world.

Takeaway

I don’t see Hyatt rolling back the 60 night requirement but I wouldn’t be surprised to see them offering challenges/matches or other forms of Globalist Lite (without the 4 suite upgrades and free Category 1 – 7 night) as we go forward. Like this latest promo from Hyatt.

What do you think? Do you think Hyatt reached too far with their elite requirement for the top?

Editorial Note - Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, hotel, airline, or other entity. This content has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of the entities included within the post.

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About the author

Charlie

Charlie has been an avid traveler and runner for many years. He has run in marathons around the world for less than it would cost to travel to the next town - all as a result of collecting and using miles and points. Over the years, he has flown hundreds of thousands of miles and collected millions of miles and points.
Now he uses this experience and knowledge to help others through Running with Miles.

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